Tag Archives: canon

Goodbye Canon IP4500, Hello Canon MG3240 Hardware | My Life 30 JUL 2013

Canon PIXMA MG3250 printerSo the other day I got a rather amusing e-mail in my inbox from my beloved Chantelle, which pretty much went along the lines of “f*ck, f*ck, f*ck, f*ck, f*cking printer not printing, die, die, die, f*cking f*ck f*ck f*ck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”.

Needless to say, I chuckled out aloud, shared the e-mail’s contents with my colleagues who had inquired as to why I was chuckling out aloud, and then shot back a reply saying that it was probably the Ubuntu desktop machine playing up again and I’ll have a look when I get home after work.

So Chantelle went off on her delivery without a printed invoice and I got home after work and looked at the printer.

Sure enough, just as she had described it in her e-mail, my trusty old Canon PIXMA IP4500 printer that I had received as a going away present from the UCTRF (University of Cape Town Retirement Fund) back when I left the employ of Commerce I.T. in 2008 was as dead as a doornail. No power, indicating that the power supply unit had most likely gone.

But hey, the printer IS five years old, which is pretty ancient in terms of personal computing then.

Taking this fact into account, I immediately decided that I would rather buy a new printer than sink money into getting the old one repaired, and so took to the Internet to source something new – and it didn’t take very long before I found what I was looking for: the gorgeous beast that is the Canon PIXMA MG3240!

Going for the ridiculously cheap price of R650 at Chaos Computers (I had to get it from the Willowbridge branch, seeing as the Somerset Mall branch has recently closed down), the Canon MG3240 is a multi-function desktop printer, which basically means that it is a lovechild born from the holy union between a printer and a scanner, in other words, it prints, it scans and it copies.

Even better, it is a wireless printer, meaning that once you’ve connected it to your home’s wireless network using the software supplied, pretty much any device with printing capabilities can send a print job over to it, meaning that my Windows laptop, Ubuntu desktop and even Android tablet (it comes with built in AirPrint support) can happily all print on the same printer – borderless if you want and without any annoying cables to get in the way!

Another pretty cool feature is its Auto Duplex Print capability, which basically means it prints the first page, sucks the page back in, and then automatically prints on the other side, without any intervention from you whatsoever! (Seriously cool, it had me giggling out aloud when I realized that you could set it up to do this and then did it for the very first time).

The only real negative that I can mark against the nifty little home inkjet printer is the fact that it only uses two cartridges, namely a black and a multi-colour, which obviously means wastage as you can’t replace individual colours as they run out.

Nevertheless, given the fact that the only printing we ever do is for Chantelle’s invoices, they ought to last long enough as it is, and like I’ve mentioned before, I don’t really have anything against switching to generics or just a refill service if the proper stuff proves to be too expensive (it’s the old razors and razorblades story after all).

Anyway, all in all this is a great little printer for home usage, and the extra functionality of the scanner and wireless printing makes it an excellent addition if you don’t exactly have lots of space on your working desk in the first place.

Definitely a product which I can recommend, and I guess I can now finally pawn off my standalone Canon LiDE 100 scanner – which basically sits all by itself, packed away in an unused cupboard anyway…

Related link: http://www.canon.co.za/For_Home/Product_Finder/Multifunctionals/Inkjet/PIXMA_MG3240/

Cartridge King My Life 11 JAN 2013

I received a pretty cool Canon IP4500 printer as a gift when I left UCT from the UCTRF a couple of years ago, and it has happily sat in my home office ever since. Of course, now that Chantelle is running her own little business here from home, it has been roped back into action for all her invoice printing, meaning of course that pretty soon it was hungrily asking for more ink cartridges.

Canon inkjet print cartridge

Sadly, Canon appears to still be charging a premium for the cartridges it uses (which is silly bearing in mind that this printer is now pretty old), meaning that to replace the cartridges with originals would cost a small fortune and as per usual, it far is cheaper just to buy a new printer which at least comes with some ink.

So instead I opted for the refill route, and after a bit of Internet searching came across Cartridge King, formerly part of the Cartridge Warehouse franchise, situated in the easily found Twin Oaks Centre down main road Somerset West. They specialize in printer cartridge refilling, re-conditioning and the import of generic compatible cartridges, and appear to have been around for a good number of years already.

cartridge-king-ink-refill-technician-at-work

A quick phone call to their landline at 021 852 8606 confirmed that it would cost me just over R220 to replace three of my cartridges with Chinese manufactured AcuInk compatibles (turns out that these have dropped so much in price that it is cheaper just to use them than to bother with refilling!), and one no hassles pick-up later my printer was back in action, happily spewing out all Chantelle’s printed invoices.

In other words, a business card worth keeping then.

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Joke Factory: Sex and the Photographer Jokes & other Funny Stuff 16 MAR 2012

The Smiths were unable to conceive children and so made the tough decision to use a surrogate father to start their family, but that it would be done the good old fashioned way, with no test tubes or needles in sight.

On the day the proxy father was to arrive, Mr. Smith kissed his wife good-bye and said, “Well, I’m off now. The man should be here soon.”

Half an hour later, just by chance, a door-to-door baby photographer rung the doorbell, hoping to make a sale.

“Good morning, Ma’am”, he said, “I’ve come to…”

“Oh, no need to explain,” Mrs. Smith cut in, embarrassed. “I’ve been expecting you.”

“Have you really?” said the photographer. “Well, that’s good. Did you know babies are my specialty?”

“Well that’s what my husband and I had hoped. Please come in and have a seat.”

After a moment she asked, blushing, “Well, where do we start?”

“Leave everything to me. I usually try two in the bathtub, one on the couch, and perhaps a couple on the bed. And sometimes the living room floor is fun. You can really spread out there.”

“Bathtub, living room floor? No wonder it didn’t work out for Harry and me!”

“Well, Ma’am, none of us can guarantee a good one every time. But if we try several different positions and I shoot from six or seven angles, I’m sure you’ll be pleased with the results.”

“My, that’s a lot!” gasped Mrs. Smith.

“Ma’am, in my line of work a man has to take his time. I’d love to be in and out in five minutes, but I’m sure you’d be disappointed with that.”

“Don’t I know it,” said Mrs. Smith quietly.

The photographer opened his briefcase and pulled out a portfolio of his baby pictures. “This was done on the top of a bus,” he said.

“Oh my God!” Mrs. Smith exclaimed, grasping at her throat.

“And these twins turned out exceptionally well – when you consider her mother was so difficult to work with.”

“She was difficult?” asked Mrs. Smith.

“Yes, I’m afraid so. I finally had to take her to the park to get the job done right. People were crowding around four and five deep to get a good look.”

“Four and five deep?” said Mrs. Smith, her eyes wide with amazement.

“Yes”, the photographer replied, “and for more than three hours, too. The mother was constantly squealing and yelling – I could hardly concentrate, and when darkness approached I had to rush my shots. Finally, when the squirrels began nibbling on my equipment, I just had to pack it all in.”

Mrs. Smith leaned forward. “Do you mean they actually chewed on your, um… equipment?”

“It’s true, Ma’am, yes. Well, if you’re ready, I’ll set-up my tripod and we can get to work right away.”

“Tripod?”

“Oh yes, Ma’am. I need to use a tripod to rest my Canon on. It’s much too big to be held in the hand for very long.”

At this point she fainted.

Ubuntu and My Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Personal Musings 19 DEC 2010

At last, I’ve finally gotten my Canon LiDE 100 Scanner to operate under Ubuntu thanks to the excellent work from the outstanding SANE and some dedicated forum answer masters.

One of the reasons for my little scanner not getting as much action over the course of this year as what I might have liked it to was the fact that no Linux drivers were available for it, meaning that it would only work on my Windows XP laptop, the machine most seldom used in my house.

However, thanks to the instructions I have lovingly saved up on CodeUnit for future reference, the little fighter is now operating at full speed, having already allowed us to publish the little ink footprints of Jessica for the world to see.

Nice! :)

Related Link: http://www.codeunit.co.za/2010/12/19/ubuntu-and-the-canon-lide-100-scanner-fix/

Ubuntu and the Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Fix CodeUnit 19 DEC 2010

Earlier this year I treated myself and purchased a Canon LiDE 100 USB Scanner (which ashamedly hasn’t seen all that much use for the rest of the year). As much as I like the little low cost fighter, one of my biggest gripes was that Canon hadn’t released any Linux drivers for the device, and because the code is proprietary, it wasn’t likely to get Linux support any time soon.

Well thankfully all of that has now changed and the wonderful SANE project has gone ahead and added driver support for the Canon LiDE 100… though getting it to work requires a little bit of effort on your part!

First, you need to grab the relevant USB libraries. So open up a terminal and enter:

sudo apt-get install libusb-dev build-essential libsane-dev

Next, grab the SANE backends from GIT. To do this, you need git-core, so:

sudo apt-get install git-core

Using the installed GIT, grab the necessary SANE backends with the following command:

git clone git://git.debian.org/sane/sane-backends.git

This grabs the necessary backends and puts them in a folder called sane-backends located in your home folder. Now switch to this directory and compile:

cd sane-backends
./configure --prefix=/usr --sysconfdir=/etc --localstatedir=/var
make
sudo make install

Note that the make command might take a while to complete. Anyway, now that everything is installed, only root can currently scan, so we’ll need to change this with some permissions:

sudo gedit /lib/udev/rules.d/40-libsane.rules

Add the following 2 lines to the bottom of the file:

# Canon CanoScan Lide 100
ATTRS{idVendor}==”04a9″, ATTRS{idProduct}==”1904″, ENV{libsane_matched}=”yes”

Save your changes, close gedit and reboot your machine.

And hey presto, all of a sudden Xsane picks up your scanner and you are back in business. Nifty! :)

(Tested on a installation of Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat)

Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Personal Musings 21 APR 2010

Alright, now we’re in business!

My delivery from Take 2 arrived two days ago and I am now a proud owner of a beautiful black Canon LiDE 100 standalone scanner.

I mentioned the reasons for wanting a scanner previously in these pages and now that I have one, I can made the jump backwards of returning to producing my art on paper and then transferring it to the digital world instead of working completely digitally from step 1. Needless to say, this should bring some more natural lines to the table and I’m excited to be putting pen to paper once again!

And now on to the scanner itself.

It is actually quite a sexy piece of hardware you know, light, slim and sleek in it’s black finish, though it does suffer a bit from those horrible looking grey plastic buttons they went and planted on the front of the thing.

On the performance front, the Canon LiDE 100 is one of the cheaper models available so it won’t exactly knock your socks off in terms of speed, but it delivers solid and relatively fine grain scanning with numerous quality options available to you through the bundled application.

It can handle 2400x4800dpi resolution with 48-bit colour and the four cheesily named “EZ” buttons allow you to copy, scan, email or PDF at the touch of a button. The scanning lid is one of those Z-lid contraptions that allows you to deal with thicker document scans, though it probably wouldn’t handle something hefty like War & Peace of course.

As for my favourite part of the whole device, the scanner runs off a standalone Hi-Speed USB connection, meaning that it transfers data through and draws power from a single USB cable – no extra power cables lying around to trip over on the floor then!

So in short, I’m very happy with this purchase that works well and looks rather nice on my desk. The only qualm I do have is the fact that Canon has released no Linux drivers for the scanner and because they keep the driver code proprietary, no third party has yet been able to reproduce a usable driver for the Canon LiDE 100 under Linux – which of course means that is bye bye Ubuntu box and hello Windows laptop for all my scanning now. :(