Tag Archives: cape town stadium

Cape Town Sevens Rugby at the Cape Town Stadium (2017-12-10) Events | Photo Gallery 23 SEP 2018

Easily one of the most eagerly awaited days on the Cape Town sports calendar, the Cape Town Sevens (more correctly known as the South Africa Sevens) is ridiculously popular. Grabbing tickets is a tricky affair, but if you manage to land a couple, then go you absolutely must.

My dad and Ryan asked me to join them for last year’s addition, the second tournament within the 2017-18 World Rugby Sevens Series. Seeing as I had up until then never been to a sevens tournament before, I eagerly said yes. Best decision ever!

Using the free pass guaranteed by our tickets, we parked in the city itself and grabbed a MyCiti bus to the gorgeous Cape Town Stadium, where after a short walk and a very slick gate operation, we filtered into the stadium and grabbed our seats.

We were there for the last day of the tournament (i.e. the most exciting day), and thanks to a particularly easy first round draw for South Africa’s Blitzbokke (namely Kenya, France and Russia), our team safely navigated their way to day 2, top of Pool A and ready take on Fiji in the first quarter-final of the day.

It was actually quite interesting to see first-hand. You see, the Cape Town Sevens isn’t popular because of the rugby itself, but rather for the massive amount of fun and atmosphere it generates, which means then that other than when the Blitzbokke are playing, the large majority of people are for the most part actually outside (in colourful costume), listening to music and catching some sun with drink FIRMLY in hand.

However, as soon as the South Africa team ran on to the field, the stadium would almost immediately fill up as the crowd grabbed their flags and started roaring in local appreciation. As it was, South Africa and Fiji put on a fighting game, ending with the Blitzbokke trotting away with a 31-26 win.

Next up was a clash with New Zealand, but sadly this battle did not go the partisan crowd’s way. Despite the thousands of waving flags and much, much cheering, the islanders put in a great effort, downing our local heroes 19-12.

That loss did of course leave a bitter taste in the mouth of most people there, meaning that the final, literally the last game of the day, played between New Zealand and Argentina (which New Zealand easily won) wasn’t as well supported as what it should have been. That said, thankfully the Bronze Medal Match between South African and Canada was still good enough to invoke a good old stadium roar.

Just as well that we won that then. (For the record, South Africa’s Seabelo Senatla ran out as the tournament’s top try scorer with 7 tries under his belt).

It was a very, very long day of quick, try-filled rugby. Loads of action, almost no down time to speak of, and plenty of festival atmosphere all around – in other words a thoroughly enjoyable day out and something which I can now fully appreciate the hype around. I liked it.

Also, fireworks.

(And a very windy night time walk back to our car. In fact, we saw a lady get blown down some steps. She was more concerned about her skirt than anything else. It was kind of hilarious – if it wasn’t for the fact that the wind was sucking the hilarity out of pretty much everything around us!)

Related Link: South Africa Sevens | Blitzbokke | HSBC World Rugby Sevens | Cape Town Stadium

Cape Town Stadium under Falcon Guard General Nonsense 09 OCT 2013

cape town stadium falcon scarlet on patrolI came across this interesting piece of news the other day – The City of Cape Town has gone and appointed a Peregrine Falcon as the official pitch protector for the Cape Town Stadium!

Essentially this is a bit of an environmentally friendly, technically non-lethal way for the stadium pitch to be kept clear of pigeons, who are the biggest obstruction when it comes to grass seeding.

Approximately 120 kg of perennial rye seed, an all-year grass cultivar, is planted monthly on the stadium pitch to repair the damage caused by sporting events and concerts. Pigeons cause the most destruction before the seeds start to germinate by consuming up to 70% of the planted seed. Consequently, the rye grass does not grow. The pigeon activity makes it difficult to keep the grass on the pitch dense – a requirement for top-quality sporting events.

The officially appointed falcon goes by the name of Scarlet, and she belongs to one Hank Chalmers, the owner of Eagle Encounters – the largest raptor rehabilitation center in Southern Africa. She was brought to the centre four years ago with a broken wing and foot after having been hit by a car. Her prospects were dire but after eight months of intense rehabilitation she was able to fly again. She will, however, never fly well enough again to hunt and survive in the wild.

Scarlet will be flown weekly at the stadium over the next six months (basically flying a lure-chase pattern created by a falconer standing in the middle of the pitch) to reinforce the presence of the predator. Thereafter, the frequency of the visits will be reduced to the level required to manage the pitch.

According to the experts, “This is a non-lethal programme. The aim is not to kill but to deter and to change the behaviour of the target species – in this case the presence of the falcon causes pigeons to adopt a new pattern of behaviour – away from the stadium. Unlike other bird-deterrent devices, the target species never becomes habituated to the presence of a live bird of prey.”

Nevertheless, I suspect there is going to be a lot of guano clean up at the stadium for the next couple of weeks, thanks to some very shit-scared pigeons flying around!

Remembering FIFA World Cup 2010: Paraguay vs. Italy My Life 27 SEP 2011

Now that the Rugby World Cup 2011 is in full swing and our boys are doing well, I can’t help but cast my mind back to the exciting period that was the FIFA World Cup 2010, hosted right here in our very own backyard.

The excitement before and during the tournament was electrifying and everywhere you went, this feeling of unity, hope and joy just couldn’t be suppressed or surpassed. Truly this was one of the finest moments in our country’s history, or at least in my lifetime.

It’s a pity our boys couldn’t have achieved more in the tournament itself, but I remember watching each and every one of their games on the edge of my seat, and I can still savour that overwhelming feeling when Tshabalala scored that magical opening goal!

As it turned out, I only managed to snag tickets for one game, that game being the first round collision between Paraguay and Italy, played here at Cape Town stadium. Dean, Terrance and Damen made up the rest of our little group, and when the match day finally arrived (it felt like forever between getting the tickets and waiting for the actual game day!), it was off to the well-organised train station at Settlers High, and onto the train to Cape Town, before stepping off and heading straight into the bustling stroll through the Cape Town Fan Walk, all the way up to the magnificent, magical stadium itself.

The weather itself was unpleasant, a cold biting wind and rain that constantly threatened to come down, but after a fair (and noisy) wait in the security queues to get in, we were finally given the go ahead to stream into the grounds, marvelling at all the sights, sounds and colours that lay before us!

Our elevated seats were behind one of the goal posts, so perhaps not the best in the house, but just the experience was enough in any event. Sheltered from the miserable wind, we got to enjoy an engrossing game, vuvuzelas trumpeting and all, the result of which I can no longer actually recall! :)

(I think it was a draw to be honest, which would have been much to Terrance’s disgust and my delight!)

Anyway, our evening had been a fantastic success, as was the tournament as a whole, and as my memory of the events begins to fade, at least I have these few photos to mark the fact that I was indeed a part of the FIFA World Cup 2010 extravaganza! :)

We’re Going to See the World Cup Baby! My Life 12 APR 2010

I’m just thinking here, but I’m pretty sure that I never mentioned on this blog that way back in the beginning of Februrary, end of January, we got confirmation that one of our two bids for tickets to the Football World Cup 2010 was actually accepted! :)

Four of us guys, namely Damen Oosthuizen, Dean Stapelberg, Terrance Brown and myself, got together and put in bids on two games, one of which turned out to be accepted, meaning that on the 14th of June 2010, at 20:30 in the evening, the four of us will be sitting somewhere in the new Cape Town Stadium (not sure where Category 4 puts us) enjoying match 11 of the football spectacular: Italy versus Paraguay.

And it’s a win-win situation as far as I’m concerned. Italy with it cadre of greats will be an awesome sight of footballing skill to experience first hand, and I know for a fact that Mr. Brown has always kind of followed/supported/cheered the Azzurri on in these big international competitions – so he’ll be pretty chuffed to see them in action I’m sure!

On the other hand, I’ve had a soft spot for the Paraguay team for quite some time now, mainly based on their heroic run in the France 1998 World Cup when the awesomeness that was Jose Luis Chilavert as a goal-scoring goalkeeper extraordinaire was on display and will be quietly hoping that they pull off another miracle and show those Italians a thing or two on the pitch! ;)

In any event, I can’t wait. Hopefully the game will be a cracker, but most of all, I’ll then be able to say that I witnessed a World Cup soccer game first hand, in person – and it was on my home soil to boot!

It’s exciting, I won’t lie! :)