Tag Archives: lide 100

Ubuntu and My Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Personal Musings 19 DEC 2010

At last, I’ve finally gotten my Canon LiDE 100 Scanner to operate under Ubuntu thanks to the excellent work from the outstanding SANE and some dedicated forum answer masters.

One of the reasons for my little scanner not getting as much action over the course of this year as what I might have liked it to was the fact that no Linux drivers were available for it, meaning that it would only work on my Windows XP laptop, the machine most seldom used in my house.

However, thanks to the instructions I have lovingly saved up on CodeUnit for future reference, the little fighter is now operating at full speed, having already allowed us to publish the little ink footprints of Jessica for the world to see.

Nice! :)

Related Link: http://www.codeunit.co.za/2010/12/19/ubuntu-and-the-canon-lide-100-scanner-fix/

Ubuntu and the Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Fix CodeUnit 19 DEC 2010

Earlier this year I treated myself and purchased a Canon LiDE 100 USB Scanner (which ashamedly hasn’t seen all that much use for the rest of the year). As much as I like the little low cost fighter, one of my biggest gripes was that Canon hadn’t released any Linux drivers for the device, and because the code is proprietary, it wasn’t likely to get Linux support any time soon.

Well thankfully all of that has now changed and the wonderful SANE project has gone ahead and added driver support for the Canon LiDE 100… though getting it to work requires a little bit of effort on your part!

First, you need to grab the relevant USB libraries. So open up a terminal and enter:

sudo apt-get install libusb-dev build-essential libsane-dev

Next, grab the SANE backends from GIT. To do this, you need git-core, so:

sudo apt-get install git-core

Using the installed GIT, grab the necessary SANE backends with the following command:

git clone git://git.debian.org/sane/sane-backends.git

This grabs the necessary backends and puts them in a folder called sane-backends located in your home folder. Now switch to this directory and compile:

cd sane-backends
./configure --prefix=/usr --sysconfdir=/etc --localstatedir=/var
make
sudo make install

Note that the make command might take a while to complete. Anyway, now that everything is installed, only root can currently scan, so we’ll need to change this with some permissions:

sudo gedit /lib/udev/rules.d/40-libsane.rules

Add the following 2 lines to the bottom of the file:

# Canon CanoScan Lide 100
ATTRS{idVendor}==”04a9″, ATTRS{idProduct}==”1904″, ENV{libsane_matched}=”yes”

Save your changes, close gedit and reboot your machine.

And hey presto, all of a sudden Xsane picks up your scanner and you are back in business. Nifty! :)

(Tested on a installation of Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat)

Canon LiDE 100 Scanner Personal Musings 21 APR 2010

Alright, now we’re in business!

My delivery from Take 2 arrived two days ago and I am now a proud owner of a beautiful black Canon LiDE 100 standalone scanner.

I mentioned the reasons for wanting a scanner previously in these pages and now that I have one, I can made the jump backwards of returning to producing my art on paper and then transferring it to the digital world instead of working completely digitally from step 1. Needless to say, this should bring some more natural lines to the table and I’m excited to be putting pen to paper once again!

And now on to the scanner itself.

It is actually quite a sexy piece of hardware you know, light, slim and sleek in it’s black finish, though it does suffer a bit from those horrible looking grey plastic buttons they went and planted on the front of the thing.

On the performance front, the Canon LiDE 100 is one of the cheaper models available so it won’t exactly knock your socks off in terms of speed, but it delivers solid and relatively fine grain scanning with numerous quality options available to you through the bundled application.

It can handle 2400x4800dpi resolution with 48-bit colour and the four cheesily named “EZ” buttons allow you to copy, scan, email or PDF at the touch of a button. The scanning lid is one of those Z-lid contraptions that allows you to deal with thicker document scans, though it probably wouldn’t handle something hefty like War & Peace of course.

As for my favourite part of the whole device, the scanner runs off a standalone Hi-Speed USB connection, meaning that it transfers data through and draws power from a single USB cable – no extra power cables lying around to trip over on the floor then!

So in short, I’m very happy with this purchase that works well and looks rather nice on my desk. The only qualm I do have is the fact that Canon has released no Linux drivers for the scanner and because they keep the driver code proprietary, no third party has yet been able to reproduce a usable driver for the Canon LiDE 100 under Linux – which of course means that is bye bye Ubuntu box and hello Windows laptop for all my scanning now. :(