Tag Archives: macbook air

MacBook Air and Xcode: Free up Disk Space by Removing Unwanted/Unavailable Device Simulators Tips, Tricks and Tutorials 29 OCT 2017

iOS software development on a MacBook Air inevitably then means that you have a couple of Xcode versions installed on your device, and as we all know, these chew up a fair bit of disk space in the process. One way to free up some disk space is to remove some of the unwanted or perhaps unavailable device simulators that build up with each Xcode update.

The first step is of course to see what you do in fact have installed, and the easiest is to do this is to make use of the simctl tool that comes with Xcode 6+. To do this, launch a terminal and run:

xcrun simctl list devices

Note the use of xcrun to locate and execute the latest development tools. In a user friendly twist, simctl allows you to bulk delete all unavailable simulators with:

xcrun simctl delete unavailable

You can also target specific devices for deletion by simply specifying them either by name or ID:

xcrun simctl delete D26C18BC-268C-6F0B-9CD8-8EFFDE6619E3

This process can actually free up quite a bit of space, particularly if you’ve been through a number of Xcode updates in the past.

Related Link: Xcode

MacBook Air: How to Update Node.js Tips, Tricks and Tutorials 14 MAR 2017

Ugh. I needed to fire up the loan MacBook Air to do an iOS compile of my recently completed Appcelerator app. Naturally, I started off on the wrong foot by not recalling the MacBook’s password (luckily I found that I had mailed it to myself some time ago, so I did eventually get in). Then Appcelerator moaned that it needed an update, which failed because it needed a newer version of Node.js to be installed.

So off to Google I once more marched, the result of which I am now jotting down here as a future reminder: How to Update Node.js on a MacBook Air.

As it turns out, updating node.js is a pretty quick affair: First, fire up a terminal (which again I needed to march over to Google in order to learn how to do), and then run the following commands:

sudo npm cache clean -f
sudo npm install -g n
sudo n stable

Note the use of sudo to run these commands. Essentially we are first force clearing the npm cache, then installing and upgrading node to the latest version.

Related Link: MacBook Air | Node.js

Mac OS X: Hunt Hard Drive Disk Space Hogs with Disk Inventory X Software & Sites 01 MAR 2016

Software development tools are often quite large and clunky, meaning that software developers often face the prospect of running out of hard drive disk space on their work machines.

I’m particularly fond of applications that use “treemaps” to visualize disk space usage, and have in the past mentioned how great Uderzo Software’s SpaceSniffer works when trying to figure out where and what to delete on a Windows machine. (If you are on Linux, then either KDirStat or QDirStat will do the trick!)

disk inventory x

Having to now publish Appcelerator apps to the Apple App Store for use on an iPad, I’ve been handed a MacBook Air (pretty little thing, but can’t say I’m a fan of the interface), and almost instantaneously ran into a space issue triggered by my installing of some development tools.

Naturally, completely new to the Apple environment, I had no idea where to even start looking for the most likely space hogging culprits!

Pleasingly, following a little time spent with good friend Mr. Google, I stumbled across Disk Inventory X, which bills itself as a disk usage utility for Mac OS X 10.3 (and later) and which uses treemaps to show the sizes of files and folders – in other words, exactly what I was looking for!

I downloaded and ran the software, and wouldn’t you know it – turns out that Android SDK had already pulled down more than 30GB of SDK related files.

Sigh, at least I now know where to start chopping…

Related Link: Disk Inventory X