Tag Archives: terry mcginnis

Review: Justice League Beyond #1-4 (Jan. 2012) Comic Books | My Reviews 11 JUN 2012

The understaffed Justice League Beyond outfit consisting of Superman, Warhawk, Kai-Ro, Barda, Aquagirl and Micron, have finally managed to get Terry McGinnis, aka Batman, onboard with the team.

As it is, his skill set is now needed more than ever, seeing as the group believes that Micron may have switched sides in order to join the snake-obsessed Kobra cult, who appear to be hatching a scheme that involves many of the remaining mystical artefacts currently on Earth.

But they’re going to have to find him first.

Alongside Batman Beyond, Justice League Beyond marks a new chapter in DC’s digital distribution strategy by being pushed out on a weekly basis,weighing it at half the page count of a normal comic per issue, but with each page neatly chopped in half to give you landscape sized images, perfect for reading on tablets or other digital devices. Every month the digital issues get collected and pushed out as a giant issue, meaning that it’s distribution model should hold something for everybody.

Konstriction comes from creators Derek Fridolfs and Dustin Nguyen, who work together on the script, and then switch hats to provide the art. And apart from doing a great job of introducing the characters of this futuristic Justice League, their main story is shaping up to be an absolute blast, containing all the necessary drama, action and twists that you expect from a Justice League tale.

On the art front, Dustin Nguyen provides the perfect stylized cartoony visuals associated with the Beyond universe, and although the style is simple, it does work, particularly if you are already familiar with the look and feel of the established futuristic universe.

Overall, this is a good one, with plenty of action, good visuals and a decent story, making it well worth picking up if you have the chance.

Review: Batman Beyond #3 (Mar. 2012) Comic Books | My Reviews 04 JUN 2012

There’s trouble in the Tan household when Doug and Dana’s father returns home, and Batman is shocked by Bruce Wayne’s new business associates. Down at the Port of Gotham, Mad Stan is back – and you can bet he’s going to live up to his name!

Alongside Justice League Beyond, Batman Beyond marks a new chapter in DC’s digital distribution strategy by being pushed out on a weekly basis,weighing it at half the page count of a normal comic per issue, but with each page neatly chopped in half to give you landscape sized images, perfect for reading on tablets or other digital devices. Every month the digital issues get collected and pushed out as a giant issue, meaning that it’s distribution model should hold something for everybody.

Batman Beyond #3 by writer Adam Beechen and featuring art by Norm Breyfogle marks part one of “The Trigger Man” story arc, with the chapter entitled “Reports of my Demise”. To be honest, the batsuit doesn’t even make an appearance in this one, but what we do get is plenty of setup action on multiple fronts, the two main ones being the return of Mad Stan who is rather keen to reclaim his explosives from his previously exclusive supplier, and Doug Tan pretty much kicking himself out of the Tan household.

So not a great starting point if you are joining this book for the first time thanks to the complete and utter lack of the Bat, but certainly an interesting start to what should be a action-packed storyline, centred around a device that can cause the detonation of any explosive device nearby! (Like a universal remote for bombs!)

Norm Breyfogle contributes some great pencils and inks on this one, and although not quite as cartoony or stylized as what we’ve come to expect from the Beyond universe with other releases, it does carry a hint of the simple lines and dark shadows expected from this particular family of books.

(It is worth noting that he does a pretty damn good job of capturing different ethnicities though!)

So in summary then, not a good starting point if you are new to the franchise, but if you’re already in it, worth picking up to catch the train to where we’re going next. That said, it also won’t harm you if you miss it, as there is nothing particularly attention-grabbing from this one.