Tag Archives: upgrade

XBMCbuntu: How to Upgrade Tips, Tricks and Tutorials 02 JUL 2014

I’m kind of fond of using XBMCbuntu on my media-serving PC hooked up to the Samsung flatscreen TV in the lounge, though I have had two epic failures thus far – which I can’t entirely blame on the operating system because I’m running some pretty ancient hardware with wonky drives. Anyway, the point is that I’ve had to reinstall from my install CD a couple of times, which then obviously puts me on a slightly out of date version at the end of the install process.

So the question is, how do I upgrade XBMCbuntu when doing a clean install is not really an acceptable option?

Well actually it is pretty easy – just use Ubuntu’s standard PPA and apt-get system.

First, you need a terminal to work in – ALT+CTRL+F1 will do the trick, though you can also select the Exit option from the XBMC power button menu, change the system selection from XBMC to XBMCbuntu, and log in with your username and password that you set when you first installed the operating system (if you can’t remember, then it is useful to note that XBMC’s root user account is ‘xbmc’ with a blank password).

Now, add the PPA using (You can probably skip this if you originally installed XBMC via an XBMCbuntu ISO):

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:team-xbmc/ppa

Finally, you simply run the usual apt-get update command (focused of course) to actually update XBMC:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get --only-upgrade install xbmc xbmc.bin

So no surprises there and you should be all done.

xbmc-logo-banner

(Just a note though, if you are moving up to v13, then it is suggested that you rather to a clean install, thanks to the myriad of rather substantial changes made audio wise due to a redesigned engine. If you don’t want to do this, then try removing all user configuration files for alsa or any alsa drivers)

Related Link: http://wiki.xbmc.org/?title=XBMCbuntu

Ubuntu Server: How to Upgrade from 10.04 LTS to 12.04 LTS Tips, Tricks and Tutorials 14 AUG 2013

ubuntu-10-logoIf you are running a corporate server that makes use of the Ubuntu linux operating system, chances are pretty high that platform stability is of the essence, and therefore you would most likely be running one of Ubuntu’s Long Term Support (LTS) releases.

Of course, software updates at a much faster pace than what a five year support cycle offers, meaning that undoubtedly you find yourself having to update to the next LTS release – and these are the particular steps required if you are about to upgrade from Ubuntu Server 10.04 LTS to Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS:

First, make sure that you have the latest updates:

sudo apt-get update & sudo apt-get upgrade

Next, install the update-manager-core package:

sudo apt-get install update-manager-core

Ensure that the update manager will only look for available LTS releases:

#Edit /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades and set Prompt=lts
sudo nano /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades

Finally, launch the upgrade tool, and follow the on-screen instructions:

sudo do-release-upgrade -d

My suggestion is not to allow prompt suppression as often you’ll get config files which need to be updated, and if you have a pretty customized environment, then it’s probably best to manage these instances by going through the diff file and making the call manually!

(A good idea before you start is of course to make backups of all your certs, config files, databases, etc.)

And that’s about all there is to it.

How to Upgrade Your Ubuntu Server Version over the Network and via the Terminal CodeUnit 20 JUL 2010

The nice thing about Canonical’s Ubuntu is that they have a nice and consistent major release cycle, making the management of your Ubuntu servers a pretty planned affair.

The question today is of course how to actually initiate a network upgrade on your terminal-only Ubuntu server once the time to upgrade finally rolls on by?

Well that actually depend on which version you are upgrading from and which version you are upgrading to!

So let’s do the most expected one for now: Upgrading your 9.10 Ubuntu Server (Karmic Koala) to 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx).

First, make sure you apply all updates to your current version (run sudo apt-get update to update your package sources and then sudo apt-get upgrade to update all the actual packages).

Next, install the update-manager-core if it isn’t already installed: sudo apt-get install update-manager-core.

Then edit /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades and set Prompt=normal.

Finally, launch the upgrade tool via sudo do-release-upgrade and then follow the on-screen instructions as the system pulls down all the necessary files over the network and attempts to upgrade your system.

Great.

If however you are upgrading from something slightly older like 8.04 LTS (Jaunty Jackalope) to 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx), you’ll have to do the following:

First, make sure you apply all updates to your current version (run sudo apt-get update to update your package sources and then sudo apt-get upgrade to update all the actual packages).

Next, install the update-manager-core if it isn’t already installed: sudo apt-get install update-manager-core.

Then edit /etc/update-manager/release-upgrades and set Prompt=lts.

Finally, launch the upgrade tool via sudo do-release-upgrade –devel-release and then follow the on-screen instructions as the system pulls down all the necessary files over the network and attempts to upgrade your system.

And that’s really all there is to it. Note that upgrading might take a while over a slow connection as there are a lot of files that need to be pulled down.

Also, if you want to see which version of Ubuntu Server you are currently running, this might be useful: cat /etc/lsb-release

Nifty, you should now be good to go! :)

Related Link: http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ubuntu/upgrade

A Retouch or Two CodeUnit 28 APR 2010

So yesterday was Freedom Day, an important (aren’t they all) public holiday on the South African calendar and one which you can see I made good use of in terms of tinkering a bit with my CodeUnit site (not to mention sleeping in, watching Batman: Brave and the Bold, going for a walk with my wife along the beach and enjoying a nice follow-up lunch on the deck at Bertie’s Mooring).

Yes, yes, I hear you, yet another “meta” post that doesn’t contain any tech, code or website info and yes, I know I kind of just upgraded the site’s look and feel pretty damn recently – but hey, sue me, I change my mind – and preferences – quite a bit! :P

Also, it is pretty important to let all of you regular readers know that you need to press Ctrl+F5 to force a cache refresh of the page in order to see all the new stylesheet and image changes.

C’mon, it’s definitely worth it.

Now the CodeUnit of Craig feels all nice and clean and pretty – far better than that grungy feel I was going with last time around! :P

Use Trash? WordPress 2.9.2 Upgrade Time Then! CodeUnit 17 FEB 2010

Do you make use of the nifty little trash feature recently introduced in WordPress 2.9 that allows you to “delete” or “trash” posts to a recycle bin from which you can then choose to permanently delete or restore at a later date?

Well if the answer is yes then it is probably a good idea to quickly update your installation version to the newly released 2.9.2 version in order to protect yourself against a nasty little bug introduced with this great new bit of functionality!

The problem is that in introducing this new core bit of functionality, developers somehow forgot to properly integrate it within WordPress’ security framework and as such were left with a situation whereby any authenticated user, no matter what rights they have (e.g. they could even be a simple subscriber), can access the trash of any other user – meaning that if you have any sensitive posts that you previously trashed, they would have in fact still pretty much been open for anyone to see.

If you still aren’t on the same page with me as to why you need to upgrade to this patched version ASAP, let me put it to you a little differently. Let us say for example you work for a boss, but being a disgruntled employee, you type up a post on the company blog revealing to the world all the naughty kinkiness you got up to your boss’ daughter. Thankfully though, a moment of sanity prevailed and you trashed the post before publishing it, so it never saw the light of day – whew! However, if the bug was still active and your boss entered the blog to add a new post or such, he would be able to read what you had previously trashed and make no doubt about it – you would now be standing out there in the cold in the unemployment line.

So do yourself a favour. Upgrade to WordPress 2.9.2 today! :)

Related Link: http://wordpress.org/development/2010/02/wordpress-2-9-2/

WordPress 2.9.1 Officially Released CodeUnit 05 JAN 2010

I see the guys at WordPress sneaked 2.9.1 live this morning, with this quickfire release attending to a number of annoying glitches and bugs brought in by the big 2.9 release that just happened a few weeks earlier.

As per usual, you can download it from the main wordpress.org site or simply upgrade your wordpress automatically by going to the Tools->Upgrade menu option in your blog’s admin area.